Back to School

Most kids in the Middle East are busy getting into the swing of a new school year right now - a fresh year of possibilities ahead to make new friends, learn new things, and dream about their futures.

But for Syrian refugee children, this time reminds them of what they've lost:  the homes they left behind, their schools, and their friends - who might be alive or dead. They are reminded of the life they used to live - the normal life of a normal kid going to a normal school - without a war!

Many Syrian children of war have been out of school for years -...MORE

Za’atari Youth Center: A Space for Change

On September 15, we officially launched the new Questscope Youth Center in the Za’atari Camp for Syrian refugees in northern Jordan. The Center—whose funders include the UN and the Middle East Broadcasting Corporation (MBC)—will engage 500 Syrian youth in recreational, educational, artistic/cultural, and psycho-social activities. The entire program has been designed and led by our dynamic team of Syrian volunteers inside the camp.

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Walking the Walk

The transformative influence of a leader is not who she is in her public performance and duty, but who her family and close friends see her to be in private. Walking the walk and not just talking the talk marks the difference between nice words, or transformation. The Questscope family struggles to make sure that we are not just talking, but actually experiencing and sustaining transformation. This is the story of one of our staff who is being transformed. And because of that, her life, who she is, transforms others.

I have always dreaded the days…those moments…when the need to...MORE

Why They Came Back

It was just a routine visit when I attended a class in one of our Non-Formal Education (NFE) centers. I wasn’t really focused on what was happening in the lesson. All my attention was devoted to watching these young children: observing how they talk, react, and smile. This is a group of kids who have seen the worst the world has to offer. Poverty and trauma from the war have made their lives fragile and chaotic, and most are struggling to just survive. Yet they come back to this class each day. I couldn’t help but wonder: why?

The children who attend Questscope’s NFE program have...MORE

Hand-in-hand....to pray.

No words can describe my feelings about what happened to Muath, our Jordanian pilot. I had two distinct pains when I saw the video. The first pain was that of seeing a human being burned alive inside a metal cage. The second pain was that of seeing a Muslim burned alive ostensibly in the name of Islam.

Those who killed the pilot believed that after the video of burning Muath was broadcast, Jordanians would start burning Jordan in response. On the next day at noon, when people were going to pray for Muath, I was walking to the mosque during the call to prayer. At...MORE

Light on the Horizon

For many of the estimated 100,000 Jordanian youth who have dropped out of school, the choice to leave school was not much of a choice at all. Lack of support in the school led to underperformance led to a kind-of choice to leave. Outside school, more frustration and struggle to survive led to desperation - where to go, who to turn to? Once out of the "system," the doors slam on opportunities for better academic and professional futures.

For Syrian refugee youth in Jordan, there was even less of a choice. In fact,...MORE

Breaking the Cycle of Violence

The violence of war marks her short life. Marwa was born 15 years ago as a Palestinian in a refugee camp in Syria. There she had friends and could go to school.

War changed everything.

She is an orphan now, and a second-time refugee.  She watched as her parents were killed. Now, she watches her only surviving uncle struggle to feed 12 children. This is dangerous for Marwa. She fears that anything can happen to her.

The violence of war is brutal. It destroys and leaves ongoing...MORE

IFE Facilitators Participate in Training

Whether the result of displacement because of war, or an extended amount of time spent out-of-school, thousands of youth in Jordan have been left on the outskirts of society. Educationally and socially, they need advocates to offer a helping hand in redirecting their course. In a project funded by the European Union, and coordinated by UNESCO, Questscope's Informal Education (IFE) program provides a stepping-stone through dialogue-based education and activities alongside positive role models. Not only does participation in this program lead to educational and vocational opportunities; it...MORE

Participatory Reflection and Action (PRA) Study for Syrian Refugees in Jordan

In July of 2012, Questscope facilitated a Participatory Reflection and Action (PRA) study to gain a better understanding of the situation for Syrian refugees in Jordan.

The PRA is way to learn from and with community members in order to understand the complexities and dimensions of a particular subject. It is not intended to collect accurate statistical information. The methodology relies on partnership and is enhanced by community knowledge and local expertise in the process of analyzing problems and finding the best solutions. Community members are deeply involved in analyzing...MORE

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