Update: Emergency Response in Syria

Overview

In late December, we sent out an urgent request for help evacuating families from Aleppo and the surrounding villages. After the front lines collapsed and the fighting ended, nearly 100,000 people were on the move from places that had been bombed and shelled. 

In the villages of Al-Foua’a and Driya, thousands of women and children were evacuated to safety in Homs after living under siege for nearly three years. 

They left with nothing and needed everything. You answered our call for help and raised almost $100,000 ‒ twice our...MORE

News from Syria

For the first time in five years there may be a glimpse of the light at the end of the tunnel in Syria. A fragile peace agreement was struck a few weeks ago that increases our on-the-ground potential to deliver humanitarian aid to more communities.

We are one of a few organizations with presence and a network of trusted partnerships in Syria. We have expanded with 1,800 staff and volunteers continuing to serve where we were and move into new places.

...MORE

Our Response to Syria - from Curt Rhodes

Syria is in the news a lot these days. And it's a place where I've spent a lot of time. It was a country of artists, engineers, teachers, people who had dreams and plans. Their children played under the shade of old trees along the edges of streets and their young people gathered in dozens of brightly-lit internet coffee shops at night. Before fighting broke out in 2011, Syria's population was 22 million. 

Today, half those Syrians have been forced to flee their homes. 7.6 million are now displaced within Syria and 4 million have become refugees in...MORE

Back to School?

Approximately 98 percent of children in the United States stood on the curbside waiting for the school bus this year.

There’s the five-year-old girl starting kindergarten. She takes that first step onto the bus, with dreams of becoming a teacher. Her future holds endless opportunity.

There’s the mother that watches her. As her daughter takes that first step onto the bus, she beams with pride thinking of her future. What will she learn? Who will she become?

Four years ago, mothers and...MORE

Informal Education: A stepping stone for a bright future

“I want to go back to my home, my games and to my bed.”

The words of Nabil, a 12-year-old Syrian refugee, tell the story of a life abruptly interrupted.

Nabil fled his home with his mother, father and four siblings three years after the outbreak of conflict in Syria. His eyes fixed on the past and feet planted in the emptiness of the present—it seemed impossible for him to walk forward.

Whatever hope he might have felt upon escaping their war-torn homeland was quickly crushed upon arriving in Jordan’s Zaatari camp. The bed Nabil used to sleep on in his home...MORE

A Better Future: Trading Violence for Community

Sufia stole from her classmates in school. Amer led a gang of boys in throwing stones at passing cars. Hani was caught spray-painting caravans.

Like Sufia, Amer and Hani, many young Syrian refugees living in Zaatari Camp have resorted to anti-social behavior in the face of frustration and boredom. Knowing this, Questscope reached out several months ago to youth in the camp to...MORE

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