Life Inside the Za'atari Refugee Camp

In 2012, Bassem fled Syria to Jordan to the Za'atari Refugee Camp to escape snipers, machine gunners, rockets, and bombs in his hometown in the south of Syria. He figured he would be in the camp for a few days and then get back to his undergraduate university studies. That will soon be four years ago.

Za'atari Camp has changed a lot since Bassem first arrived. From a cluster of hundreds of emergency UN tents in the middle of deserted fields not far outside Za’atari town, it has grown to become the 4th largest city in Jordan - a...MORE

Our Response to Syria - from Curt Rhodes

Syria is in the news a lot these days. And it's a place where I've spent a lot of time. It was a country of artists, engineers, teachers, people who had dreams and plans. Their children played under the shade of old trees along the edges of streets and their young people gathered in dozens of brightly-lit internet coffee shops at night. Before fighting broke out in 2011, Syria's population was 22 million. 

Today, half those Syrians have been forced to flee their homes. 7.6 million are now displaced within Syria and 4 million have become refugees in...MORE

Caring for the Other Refugees

via The New York Times 

The world’s attention has been riveted on the refugee crisis unfolding in Europe, and on the shift in Europe as leaders, finally, take steps to deal with it. But one of the reasons Syrians are risking their lives to reach Europe is that life has become unbearable in the countries closer to home where many have taken refuge.

About 12 million Syrians — more than half the country’s prewar population — have been displaced...MORE

No Lost Generation

 Not only war and displacement can create a violent generation but also isolation would enhance the chances of creating at risk youth and socially alienated girls and boys.       

 No Lost Generation is the name of the new project Questscope is working on, in cooperation with Mercy Corps, mentoring around 200 Jordanian and Syrian Children, in 2 cities in Northern Jordan.

 Labeled as violent or socially alienated, would only make it harder for these boys...MORE

Light on the Horizon

For many of the estimated 100,000 Jordanian youth who have dropped out of school, the choice to leave school was not much of a choice at all. Lack of support in the school led to underperformance led to a kind-of choice to leave. Outside school, more frustration and struggle to survive led to desperation - where to go, who to turn to? Once out of the "system," the doors slam on opportunities for better academic and professional futures.

For Syrian refugee youth in Jordan, there was even less of a choice. In fact,...MORE

The Story & the Glory: Reducing Youth Radicalism & Violence in the Middle East

Questscope founder Dr. Curt Rhodes talks to Creative Associates about reducing youth radicalism and violence in the Middle East:

In a world gone awry in war and conflict, with few economic opportunities and degradation of social networks, youth are radicalized and sustained in their radicalization through their relationships: the way into radicalization is through relationships.

But so is the way out.

Every person has a story. Taking time to listen and elicit someone’s story is...MORE

Thoughts from Curt Rhodes

I’ve been spending a lot of my time lately with college students. During recent conversations at city pubs and coffee shops in Boston, I couldn’t help but think: young people have a lot of energy.

Their energy is wrapped up in many different areas. Channeled appropriately, it can change the world. The same holds true for young people in the Middle East—and there are a lot of them. No doubt, they have energy. The question is: how will they use it?

Youth in the Middle East are one of the most marginalized populations....MORE

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