Remember Us

This is a reflection written by Nadia Schroeder, daughter of Curt Rhodes, after she visited Zaatari Camp a few weeks ago.

“What would you like Americans to know? What is your message to Americans?” We asked a group of Syrian refugees in the Zaatari Refugee Camp. “Syrians love life.” “And we are fahmaneen,” which means “we are not ignorant, but rather perceptive, cultured, and knowledgeable.”

This was a statement we heard many times throughout the day we spent at Zaatari. “We are not, as many view us, ‘pathetic and uneducated refugees’” one young man in...MORE

The Month of Ramadan

The holy month of Ramadan took place this year from June 18 to July 16. The timing of this month of fasting from sunrise to sunset is based on the lunar Muslim liturgical calendar and varies from year to year.

It is marked by a refocus on spiritual life and includes recitations by children of the Holy Quran, much like Christian children reciting memorized Bible Verses in a spelling bee format. Successful "recitees" get certificates of recognition and gifts to encourage them to know and understand their religion. For 28 consecutive evenings, every "break-fast" is a shared meal with...MORE

Me/We and Questscope event to UN

Invisibility and voicelessness are two characteristics that plague refugee populations. The vibrant individual life story is too often obscured once a person has been labeled as a refugee. Questscope is committed to giving a platform to that individual voice and to partnering with organizations who share that same ideal.

About a year and a half ago, Questscope partnered with Me/We Syria. Founded by Mohsin Mohi-Ud Din and funded by the German government, Me/We Syria helps disadvantaged youth narrate their...MORE

When a picture speaks a thousand words

When voices can't be heard, photography can cross all cultural and linguistic barriers, to tell a story and reflect the anguish buried inside the hearts and minds of Syrian war refugees, some of whom are traumatized beyond finding word to communicate.

A project called Photo Voice was implemented in a few of our Non-Formal Education centers to give children a chance, beyond words, to be understood.

Photo Voice is a kind of participatory action research that utilizes both images and group dialogue as a way to understand the experience of marginalized or disadvantaged...MORE

Mentor's Reality

"It was the worse trip I had to take in my life, a trip where I had to leave my home, all my belongings. I remember a tear in the eye of my old neighbor and the shadows of a homeland that we may never come back to."

"Here in the refugee camp, our new reality: “refugees.” There were times when we would be so frustrated it turned into self-pity, and everything around us seemed to have only a black color. At those points we could have been thinking, this is the end of the journey!"

"Except, it’s not!"

"When you meet...MORE

Light on the Horizon

For many of the estimated 100,000 Jordanian youth who have dropped out of school, the choice to leave school was not much of a choice at all. Lack of support in the school led to underperformance led to a kind-of choice to leave. Outside school, more frustration and struggle to survive led to desperation - where to go, who to turn to? Once out of the "system," the doors slam on opportunities for better academic and professional futures.

For Syrian refugee youth in Jordan, there was even less of a choice. In fact,...MORE

A Safe Place

In moments of stress and tragedy, we look for a safe place. For Amer, 16 years old, that safe place used to be his school and his home in Syria.

 When his family left Syria to come to Jordan’s Zaatari camp, those safe places were ripped away from him one by one. He was not able to go to school. His father had been injured and lost his brother in the war. The stress his family felt was redirected toward him, and Amer was confined to home and often abused. His home, the only place he could go, was no longer a safe place at all.

 Amer used to love to study,...MORE

Rawan's Story: Strength, Healing, Rebuilding

When is enough, enough?

For Rawan, a 14-year-old Syrian refugee, you could say enough was enough when she had to leave behind her school, her friends, and her home in Syria. She had just completed 8th grade and had the world at her fingertips.

Rawan’s mother led the family of four girls and two boys into Jordan. Alone. Their father had to stay behind in Syria. Instead of hanging out with friends and going to school like most teenagers, Rawan was left with a heavy burden of chores and the responsibility of caring for her siblings.

Feeling trapped,...MORE

Investing in the future: Questscope mentor talks to UNHCR about youth in the Middle East

"Youth are the spirit of life. They determine how developed or underdeveloped a nation is and are the key criteria in any community." (Zaher, Questscope Mentor Coordinator, Zaatari Camp)

Zaher is from the city of Daraa in Syria. At 25, his past is full of accomplishments: he has a bachelor's degree in history and education, and worked in Syria as a teacher. His future is full of dreams: to pursue a PhD, get married and have children. But when he came to Jordan's Zaatari refugee camp with his family, his view of the future took on a different shape. Now, he works for...MORE

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