Tiny Spark

The Syrian Civil War hit girls especially hard. They should be safe in their own neighborhoods, studying for school and doing things with their friends. Instead, they watched their homes destroyed by rockets and their families torn apart as they fled for safety.     

Refugee families that were loving and stable before the war are fracturing under exhausting daily struggles. The burden on girls to help keep their families together forces them to grow up before they are mature enough to shoulder such responsibility. And they are often kept at home for their...MORE

Jean Vanier Wins Templeton Prize

Questscope congratulates Jean Vanier, recipient of the 2015 Templeton Prize. The esteemed award honors a living person who has made an exceptional contribution to affirming life's spiritual dimension, whether through insight, discovery, or practical works. Vanier is the founder of L’Arche International, a global network of residential communities in which people with and without disabilities share their lives.

 Vanier is a longtime friend of Questscope, and mentor who has inspired our team and our work with disadvantaged youth. He emphasizes empowerment and healing through...MORE

No Lost Generation

 Not only war and displacement can create a violent generation but also isolation would enhance the chances of creating at risk youth and socially alienated girls and boys.       

 No Lost Generation is the name of the new project Questscope is working on, in cooperation with Mercy Corps, mentoring around 200 Jordanian and Syrian Children, in 2 cities in Northern Jordan.

 Labeled as violent or socially alienated, would only make it harder for these boys...MORE

The Story & the Glory: Reducing Youth Radicalism & Violence in the Middle East

Questscope founder Dr. Curt Rhodes talks to Creative Associates about reducing youth radicalism and violence in the Middle East:

In a world gone awry in war and conflict, with few economic opportunities and degradation of social networks, youth are radicalized and sustained in their radicalization through their relationships: the way into radicalization is through relationships.

But so is the way out.

Every person has a story. Taking time to listen and elicit someone’s story is...MORE

A Safe Place

In moments of stress and tragedy, we look for a safe place. For Amer, 16 years old, that safe place used to be his school and his home in Syria.

 When his family left Syria to come to Jordan’s Zaatari camp, those safe places were ripped away from him one by one. He was not able to go to school. His father had been injured and lost his brother in the war. The stress his family felt was redirected toward him, and Amer was confined to home and often abused. His home, the only place he could go, was no longer a safe place at all.

 Amer used to love to study,...MORE

Rawan's Story: Strength, Healing, Rebuilding

When is enough, enough?

For Rawan, a 14-year-old Syrian refugee, you could say enough was enough when she had to leave behind her school, her friends, and her home in Syria. She had just completed 8th grade and had the world at her fingertips.

Rawan’s mother led the family of four girls and two boys into Jordan. Alone. Their father had to stay behind in Syria. Instead of hanging out with friends and going to school like most teenagers, Rawan was left with a heavy burden of chores and the responsibility of caring for her siblings.

Feeling trapped,...MORE

Thoughts from Curt Rhodes

I’ve been spending a lot of my time lately with college students. During recent conversations at city pubs and coffee shops in Boston, I couldn’t help but think: young people have a lot of energy.

Their energy is wrapped up in many different areas. Channeled appropriately, it can change the world. The same holds true for young people in the Middle East—and there are a lot of them. No doubt, they have energy. The question is: how will they use it?

Youth in the Middle East are one of the most marginalized populations....MORE

Investing in the future: Questscope mentor talks to UNHCR about youth in the Middle East

"Youth are the spirit of life. They determine how developed or underdeveloped a nation is and are the key criteria in any community." (Zaher, Questscope Mentor Coordinator, Zaatari Camp)

Zaher is from the city of Daraa in Syria. At 25, his past is full of accomplishments: he has a bachelor's degree in history and education, and worked in Syria as a teacher. His future is full of dreams: to pursue a PhD, get married and have children. But when he came to Jordan's Zaatari refugee camp with his family, his view of the future took on a different shape. Now, he works for...MORE

Breaking the Cycle of Violence

The violence of war marks her short life. Marwa was born 15 years ago as a Palestinian in a refugee camp in Syria. There she had friends and could go to school.

War changed everything.

She is an orphan now, and a second-time refugee.  She watched as her parents were killed. Now, she watches her only surviving uncle struggle to feed 12 children. This is dangerous for Marwa. She fears that anything can happen to her.

The violence of war is brutal. It destroys and leaves ongoing...MORE

Questscope at Regional Conference Dedicated to Protection of Refugee Children

Questscope’s Muthanna Khriesat, Jordan Country Director, and Mike Niconchuk, Emergency Response Coordinator, will participate this week in the first regional conference dedicated to the protection of refugee children and youth. The conference, “Investing in the Future: Protecting Refugee Children in the Middle East and North Africa,” will be held October 15th and 16th in Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, and is hosted by the UNHCR, in partnership with...MORE

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